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Reprogramming the murine colon cancer microenvironment using lentivectors encoding shRNA against IL-10 as a component of a potent DC-based chemoimmunotherapy

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BACKGROUND: The excessive amounts of immunosuppressive factors present in a tumor microenvironment (TME) reduce the effectiveness of cancer vaccines. The main objective of our research was to improve the effectiveness of dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy or chemoimmunotherapy composed of cyclophosphamide (CY) and DCs by application of lentivectors encoding shRNA specific to IL-10 (shIL10 LVs) in murine colon carcinoma MC38 model. METHODS: The efficacy of shIL10 LVs in silencing of IL-10 expression was measured both in vitro and in vivo using Real-Time PCR and ELISA assays. In addition, the influence of intratumorally inoculated lentivectors on MC38 tumor microenvironment was examined using flow cytometry method. The effect of applied therapeutic schemes was determined by measurement of tumor growth inhibition and activation state of local and systemic immune response. RESULTS: We observed that intratumorally inoculated shIL10 LVs transduced tumor and TME-infiltrating cells and reduced the secretion of IL-10. Application of shIL10 LVs for three consecutive weeks initiated tumor growth inhibition, whereas treatment with shIL10 LVs and BMDC/TAg did not enhance the antitumor effect. However, when pretreatment with CY was introduced to the proposed scheme, we noticed high MC38 tumor growth inhibition accompanied by reduction of MDSCs and Tregs in TME, as well as activation of potent local and systemic Th1-type antitumor response. CONCLUSIONS: The obtained data shows that remodeling of TME by shIL10 LVs and CY enhances DC activity and supports them during regeneration and actuation of a potent antitumor response. Therefore, therapeutic strategies aimed at local IL-10 elimination using lentiviral vectors should be further investigated in context of combined chemoimmunotherapies.

Author Info: (1) Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. R. Weigla 12, 53-114, Wroclaw, Poland. joanna@iitd.pan.wroc.pl. (2) Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology

Author Info: (1) Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. R. Weigla 12, 53-114, Wroclaw, Poland. joanna@iitd.pan.wroc.pl. (2) Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. R. Weigla 12, 53-114, Wroclaw, Poland. (3) Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. R. Weigla 12, 53-114, Wroclaw, Poland. (4) Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. R. Weigla 12, 53-114, Wroclaw, Poland. (5) Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. R. Weigla 12, 53-114, Wroclaw, Poland.

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Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase provides adaptive resistance to immune checkpoint inhibitors in hepatocellular carcinoma

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Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Immune checkpoint blockade with anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-1 antibodies has shown promising results in the treatment of patients with advanced HCC. The anti-PD-1 antibody, nivolumab, is now approved for patients who have had progressive disease on the current standard of care. However, a subset of patients with advanced HCC treated with immune checkpoint inhibitors failed to respond to therapy. Here, we provide evidence of adaptive resistance to immune checkpoint inhibitors through upregulation of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) in HCC. Anti-CTLA-4 treatment promoted an induction of IDO1 in resistant HCC tumors but not in tumors sensitive to immune checkpoint blockade. Using both subcutaneous and hepatic orthotopic models, we found that the addition of an IDO inhibitor increases the efficacy of treatment in HCC resistant tumors with high IDO induction. Furthermore, in vivo neutralizing studies demonstrated that the IDO induction by immune checkpoint blockade was dependent on IFN-gamma. Similar findings were observed with anti-PD-1 therapy. These results provide evidence that IDO may play a role in adaptive resistance to immune checkpoint inhibitors in patients with HCC. Therefore, inhibiting IDO in combination with immune checkpoint inhibitors may add therapeutic benefit in tumors which overexpress IDO and should be considered for clinical evaluation in HCC.

Author Info: (1) Thoracic and GI Malignancies Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Building 10, Room 3B43, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA

Author Info: (1) Thoracic and GI Malignancies Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Building 10, Room 3B43, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. (2) Thoracic and GI Malignancies Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Building 10, Room 3B43, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. Department of Internal Medicine and Liver Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea. (3) Thoracic and GI Malignancies Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Building 10, Room 3B43, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. (4) Thoracic and GI Malignancies Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Building 10, Room 3B43, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. (5) Thoracic and GI Malignancies Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Building 10, Room 3B43, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. (6) Thoracic and GI Malignancies Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Building 10, Room 3B43, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. (7) Thoracic and GI Malignancies Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Building 10, Room 3B43, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. (8) Thoracic and GI Malignancies Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Building 10, Room 3B43, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. (9) Thoracic and GI Malignancies Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Building 10, Room 3B43, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. (10) Thoracic and GI Malignancies Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Building 10, Room 3B43, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. tim.greten@nih.gov. National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research, Liver Cancer Program, Bethesda, USA. tim.greten@nih.gov.

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Alteration of circulating natural autoantibodies to CD25-derived peptide antigens and FOXP3 in non-small cell lung cancer

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Natural autoantibody is a key component for immune surveillance function. Regulatory T (Treg) cells play indispensable roles in promoting tumorigenesis via immune escape mechanisms. Both CD25 and FOXP3 are specific markers for Treg cells and their natural autoantibodies may be involved in anticancer activities. This work was designed to develop an in-house enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to examine plasma natural IgG against CD25 and FOXP3 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Compared with control subjects, NSCLC patients had significantly higher levels of plasma IgG for CD25a (Z = -8.05, P < 0.001) and FOXP3 (Z = -4.17, P < 0.001), lower levels for CD25b (Z = -3.58, P < 0.001), and a trend toward lower levels for CD25c (Z = -1.70, P = 0.09). Interestingly, the anti-CD25b IgG assay had a sensitivity of 25.0% against a specificity of 95.0% in an early stage patients (T1N0M0) who showed the lowest anti-CD25b IgG levels among 4 subgroups classified based on staging information. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that patients with high anti-FOXP3 IgG levels had shorter survival than those with low anti-FOXP3 IgG levels (chi(2) = 3.75, P = 0.05). In conclusion, anti-CD25b IgG may be a promising biomarker in terms of screening individuals at high risk of lung cancer.

Author Info: (1) Second Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, 130041, China. (2) Second Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, 130041, China. zhangxuankj@163.com. (3) Department of Thoracic Surgery, China-Japan

Author Info: (1) Second Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, 130041, China. (2) Second Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, 130041, China. zhangxuankj@163.com. (3) Department of Thoracic Surgery, China-Japan Union Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun, 130031, China. (4) Second Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, 130041, China. (5) Second Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, 130041, China. wyang2020@jlu.edu.cn. (6) Institute of Health Research & Innovation, University of the Highlands & Islands, Centre for Health Science, Inverness, IV2 3JH, UK.

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An Anti-CLL-1 Antibody-Drug Conjugate for the Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

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PURPOSE: The treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has not significantly changed in 40 years. Cytarabine and anthracyclinebased chemotherapy induction regimens (7 + 3) remain the standard of care, and most patients have poor long-term survival. The re-approval of Mylotarg, an anti-CD33-calicheamicin antibody-drug conjugate (ADC), has demonstrated ADCs as a clinically validated option to enhance the effectiveness of induction therapy. We are interested in developing a next generation ADC for AML to improve upon the initial success of Mylotarg. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The expression pattern of CLL-1 and its hematopoietic potential were investigated. A novel anti-CLL-1-ADC, with a highly potent pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD) dimer conjugated through a self-immolative disulfide linker, was developed. The efficacy and safety profiles of this ADC were evaluated in mouse xenograft models and in cynomolgus monkeys. RESULTS: We demonstrate that CLL-1 shares similar prevalence and trafficking properties that make CD33 an excellent ADC target for AML, but lacks expression on hematopoietic stem cells that hampers current CD33 targeted ADCs. Our anti-CLL-1-ADC is highly effective at depleting tumor cells in AML xenograft models and lacks target independent toxicities at doses that depleted target monocytes and neutrophils in cynomolgus monkeys. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, our data suggest that an anti-CLL-1-ADC has the potential to become an effective and safer treatment for AML in humans, by reducing and allowing for faster recovery from initial cytopenias than the current generation of ADCs for AML.

Author Info: (1) Translational Oncology & Cancer Signaling, Genentech Inc. (2) Translational Oncology, Genentech, Inc. (3) In Vivo Pharmacology, Genentech. (4) Research and Early Development, Genentech, Inc

Author Info: (1) Translational Oncology & Cancer Signaling, Genentech Inc. (2) Translational Oncology, Genentech, Inc. (3) In Vivo Pharmacology, Genentech. (4) Research and Early Development, Genentech, Inc. (5) Translational Oncology, Genentech, Inc. (6) Research and Early Development, Genentech, Inc. (7) Research and Early Development, Genentech, Inc. (8) Antibody Engineering, Genentech, Inc. (9) Antibody Engineering, Genentech, Inc. (10) Pathology, Genentech. (11) Genentech, Inc. (12) Safety Assessment, Genentech, Inc. (13) Research and Early Development, Genentech, Inc. (14) Safety Assessment, Amgen, Inc. (15) Oncology Clinical Science, Genentech Inc. (16) Genentech, Inc. (17) Safety Assessment, Genentech. (18) Genentech, Inc. (19) Research and Early Development, Genentech, Inc. polson@gene.com.

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Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 Inhibition Lowers PD-1 Expression, Promotes Long-term Survival and Memory Generation in Antigen-specific CAR-T cells

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Successful remission in hematological cancers by CAR-T cell immunotherapy has yet to be replicated in solid tumors like GBM. A significant impediment of CAR-T immunotherapy in solid tumors is poor exposure of T cells to tumor antigens resulting in suboptimal CAR-T cell activation, which ultimately fails to induce a robust anti-tumor immune response. Costimulatory moieties in advanced-generation CARs, along with additional IL2 therapy has been shown to be insufficient to overcome this hurdle and have its cytotoxic limitations. GSK3 is constitutively active in naive T cells and is transiently inactivated during T cell activation resulting in rapid T cell proliferation. Pharmacologic inhibition of GSK3 in GBM-specific CAR-T cells reduced FasL expression, increased T cell proliferation and reduced exhaustion by lowering PD-1 levels resulting in the development of CAR-T effector memory phenotype. Treatment with GSK3-inhibited CAR-T cells resulted in 100% tumor elimination during the tumor-rechallenge experiment in GBM-bearing animals and increased accumulation of memory CAR-T cells in secondary lymphoid organs. These adjuvant-like effects of GSK3 inhibition on activated CAR-T cells may be a valuable adjunct to a successful implementation of CAR-T immunotherapy against GBM and other solid tumors.

Author Info: (1) Brain Tumor Laboratory, Roger Williams Medical Center, Providence, RI, USA; Department of Neurosurgery, Alpert School of Medicine, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA. Electronic address

Author Info: (1) Brain Tumor Laboratory, Roger Williams Medical Center, Providence, RI, USA; Department of Neurosurgery, Alpert School of Medicine, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA. Electronic address: sadhak_sengupta@brown.edu. (2) Department of Surgery, Roger Williams Medical Center, Providence, RI, USA; Department of Surgery, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA. (3) Brain Tumor Laboratory, Roger Williams Medical Center, Providence, RI, USA. (4) Brain Tumor Laboratory, Roger Williams Medical Center, Providence, RI, USA; Department of Neurosurgery, Alpert School of Medicine, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA.

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Combination therapy improves immune response and prognosis in patients with advanced oral mucosal melanoma: A clinical treatment success

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OBJECTIVE: This study was undertaken to analyze disease response and immune response to assess treatment effectiveness and success in patients with advanced oral mucosal melanoma treated with cytokines injection, cryosurgery, and adoptive cell transfer therapy. STUDY DESIGN: Ten patients were enrolled in the study, and the relevant characteristics and immunologic differences were evaluated. RESULTS: All patients achieved an objective clinical response according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, including 7 cases of continuing complete remission (55, 27, 87 + , 58(+), 58 + , 45 + , and 37 + months) and 3 cases of partial remission (30, 12, and 9 months). Five responders are currently alive. After combination therapy, we observed that the proportion of CD3+ lymphocytes and the secretion of interferon-gamma increased, whereas interleukin-10 decreased. In the assay of improved cytokine-induced killer cells, CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells declined, and natural killer cells upregulated. Meanwhile, the proliferation rate of in vitro cultured improved cytokine-induced killer cells improved after courses of therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Combination therapy of cytokine injection, cryosurgery, and transfer of improved cytokine-induced killer cells may be a promising approach for patients with oral mucosal melanoma.

Author Info: (1) Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Clinical Laboratory, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Stomatology

Author Info: (1) Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Clinical Laboratory, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Guangzhou, China. (2) Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Clinical Laboratory, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Guangzhou, China. (3) Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Clinical Laboratory, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Guangzhou, China. (4) Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Clinical Laboratory, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Guangzhou, China. (5) Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Clinical Laboratory, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: Wanghua9@mail.sysu.edu.cn.

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Tumor Cell-Intrinsic Factors Underlie Heterogeneity of Immune Cell Infiltration and Response to Immunotherapy

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The biological and functional heterogeneity between tumors-both across and within cancer types-poses a challenge for immunotherapy. To understand the factors underlying tumor immune heterogeneity and immunotherapy sensitivity, we established a library of congenic tumor cell clones from an autochthonous mouse model of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. These clones generated tumors that recapitulated T cell-inflamed and non-T-cell-inflamed tumor microenvironments upon implantation in immunocompetent mice, with distinct patterns of infiltration by immune cell subsets. Co-injecting tumor cell clones revealed the non-T-cell-inflamed phenotype is dominant and that both quantitative and qualitative features of intratumoral CD8(+) T cells determine response to therapy. Transcriptomic and epigenetic analyses revealed tumor-cell-intrinsic production of the chemokine CXCL1 as a determinant of the non-T-cell-inflamed microenvironment, and ablation of CXCL1 promoted T cell infiltration and sensitivity to a combination immunotherapy regimen. Thus, tumor cell-intrinsic factors shape the tumor immune microenvironment and influence the outcome of immunotherapy.

Author Info: (1) Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. (2) Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 340

Author Info: (1) Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. (2) Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Electronic address: byrnek@upenn.edu. (3) Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. (4) Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. (5) Institute for Immunology, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. (6) Cancer Biology and Genetics Program, Sloan-Kettering Institute, NY 10065, USA. (7) Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. (8) Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. (9) Center for RNA Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Department of Urology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY 14642, USA. (10) Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. (11) Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. (12) Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. (13) Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. (14) Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. (15) Department of Cell, Developmental and Cancer Biology, Oregon Health & Sciences University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Rd, Portland, OR 97239, USA. (16) Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. (17) Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. (18) Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. (19) Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. (20) Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. (21) Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. (22) Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. (23) Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; Institute for Immunology, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. (24) Penn Genomic Analysis Core, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. (25) Cancer Biology and Genetics Program, Sloan-Kettering Institute, NY 10065, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 415 East 68(th) Street New York, NY 10065, USA. (26) Department of Cell, Developmental and Cancer Biology, Oregon Health & Sciences University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Rd, Portland, OR 97239, USA. (27) Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; Institute for Immunology, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. (28) Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; Institute for Immunology, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Electronic address: rhv@upenn.edu. (29) Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Electronic address: bstanger@upenn.edu.

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Therapeutic vaccines and immune checkpoints inhibition options for gynecological cancers

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Treatments for gynecological cancer include surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. However, overall survival is not improved, and novel approaches are needed. Immunotherapy has been proven efficacious in various types of cancers and multiple approaches have been recently developed. Since numerous gynecological cancers are associated to human papilloma virus (HPV) infections, therapeutic vaccines, targeting HPV epitopes, have been developed. The advancing understanding of the immune system, regulatory pathways and tumor microenvironment have produced a major interest in immune checkpoint blockade, Indeed, immune checkpoint molecules are important clinical targets in a wide variety of tumors, including gynecological. In this review, we will describe the immunotherapeutic targets and modalities available and review the most recent immunotherapeutic clinical trials in the context of gynecological cancers. The synergic results obtained from the combination of HPV therapeutic vaccines with radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or immune checkpoint inhibitors, may underlie the potential for a novel therapeutic scenario for these tumors.

Author Info: (1) Department of Gynecological and Obstetric Sciences, and Urological Sciences, University of Rome "Sapienza", Umberto I Hospital, Rome, Italy. Electronic address: chiara.ditucci@uniroma1.it. (2) Department of

Author Info: (1) Department of Gynecological and Obstetric Sciences, and Urological Sciences, University of Rome "Sapienza", Umberto I Hospital, Rome, Italy. Electronic address: chiara.ditucci@uniroma1.it. (2) Department of Gynecological and Obstetric Sciences, and Urological Sciences, University of Rome "Sapienza", Umberto I Hospital, Rome, Italy. Electronic address: michelecarlo.schiavi@uniroma1.it. (3) Department of Gynecological and Obstetric Sciences, and Urological Sciences, University of Rome "Sapienza", Umberto I Hospital, Rome, Italy. Electronic address: pierangelo.faiano@uniroma1.it. (4) Department of Gynecological and Obstetric Sciences, and Urological Sciences, University of Rome "Sapienza", Umberto I Hospital, Rome, Italy. Electronic address: ottavia.doria@uniroma1.it. (5) Department of Gynecological and Obstetric Sciences, and Urological Sciences, University of Rome "Sapienza", Umberto I Hospital, Rome, Italy. Electronic address: giovanni.prata@uniroma1.it. (6) Department of Gynecological and Obstetric Sciences, and Urological Sciences, University of Rome "Sapienza", Umberto I Hospital, Rome, Italy. Electronic address: valentina.sciuga@uniroma1.it. (7) Department of Gynecological and Obstetric Sciences, and Urological Sciences, University of Rome "Sapienza", Umberto I Hospital, Rome, Italy. (8) Department of Gynecological and Obstetric Sciences, and Urological Sciences, University of Rome "Sapienza", Umberto I Hospital, Rome, Italy. (9) Department of Gynecological and Obstetric Sciences, and Urological Sciences, University of Rome "Sapienza", Umberto I Hospital, Rome, Italy. (10) Department of Gynecological and Obstetric Sciences, and Urological Sciences, University of Rome "Sapienza", Umberto I Hospital, Rome, Italy.

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TLS11a Aptamer/CD3 Antibody Anti-Tumor System for Liver Cancer

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New therapeutic approaches are needed for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which is the most common primary malignancy of the liver. Bispecific T-cell engagers (BiTE) can effectively redirect T cells against tumors and show a strong anti-tumor effect. However, the potential immunogenicity, complexity, and high cost significantly limit their clinical application. In this paper, we used the hepatoma cells-specific aptamer TLS11a and anti-CD3 for to establish an aptamer/antibody bispecific system (AAbs), TLS11a/CD3, which showed advantages over BiTE and can specifically redirect T cells to lyse tumor cells. TLS11a-SH and anti-CD3-NH2 were crosslinked with sulfosuccinimidyl 4-(N-maleimidomethyl) cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (sulfo-SMCC). T cell activation, proliferation, and cytotoxicity of TLS11a/CD3 were analyzed by flow cytometry. Cytokine array was used to detect cytokine released from activated T cells. Hepatoma xenograft model was used to monitor the tumor volume and survival. TLS11a/CD3 could specifically bind hepatoma cells (H22) and T cells, activated T cells to mediate antigen-specific lysis of H22 cells in vitro, and effectively inhibited the growth of implanted H22 tumors as well as prolonged mice survival. TLS11a/CD3 could simultaneously target hepatoma cells and T cells, specifically guide T cells to kill tumor cells, and enhance the anti-tumor effect of T cells both in vitro and in vivo.

Author Info: (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)

Author Info: (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)

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Functionalized Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Targeting Delivery of Immunostimulatory CpG Oligonucleotides Against Prostate Cancer

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Immuno-based oncotherapy has been successfully implemented for cancer treatment. In the present study, we developed a Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing unmethylated CpG motifs (CpG ODNs) nano-delivery system based on Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) conjugated with H3R6 polypeptide (MHR-CpG) for prostate cancer immunotherapy. The in vitro and in vivo toxicity data revealed that the prepared MHR showed high biocompatibility. Confocal laser scanning microscopy confirmed that MHR-CpG could specifically target the endosomal TLR9. In addition, the use of MHR enhanced the immunogenicity of CpG in both humoral and cellular immune pathways, as evidenced by the increased expression of CD4+ T-cells, CD8+ T-cells, TNF-alpha, and IL-6. The in vivo anti-cancer efficacy study on RM-1 tumor-bearing mice demonstrated that MHR-CpG could deliver the immunotherapeutics to the tumor site and the tumor-draining lymph node to suppress tumor growth. These results suggested that MHR-CpG was a promising multifunctional nano system for prostate cancer immunotherapy.

Author Info: (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)

Author Info: (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)

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