In the Spotlight...

Stereotactic Body Radiation and Interleukin-12 Combination Therapy Eradicates Pancreatic Tumors by Repolarizing the Immune Microenvironment

Mills et al. demonstrated that the combination of stereotactic body radiation therapy and intratumoral injection of microspheres encapsulating IL-12 led to reduced tumor burden and increased survival ...

CLINICAL TRIAL: Intratumoral delivery of plasmid interleukin-12 via electroporation leads to regression of injected and non-injected tumors in Merkel cell carcinoma

Bhatia et al. investigated the safety and efficacy of intratumoral (i.t.) delivery and electroporation of IL-12 plasmid DNA (i.t.-tavo-EP) in 15 patients (3 as neoadjuvant treatment) with either locor...

PTPN3 expressed in activated T lymphocytes is a candidate for a non-antibody-type immune checkpoint inhibitor

Fujimura et al. show that activated human T cells (following treatment with anti-CD3 plus IL-2 or antigen-pulsed dendritic cells in vitro), but not resting T or NK cells, selectively increased express...

CAR exosomes derived from effector CAR-T cells have potent antitumour effects and low toxicity

Fu and Lei et al. observed that exosomes derived from EGFR and HER2-targeted CAR T cells expressed surface CAR, contained perforin and granzyme B, specifically lysed target antigen-expressing cancer c...

Previous Digests

Anti-CTLA-4 relies on RIG-I for tumor control

October 9, 2019

Aiming to improve the consistency of response to checkpoint inhibitors, Heidegger and Wintges et al. explored how the signaling of RIG-I – a cytosolic sensor that detects double-stranded RNA during bacterial or viral infection – contributes to IFN-I production...

CICON19 - 5th CRI-CIMT-EATI-AACR International Cancer Immunotherapy Conference

October 2, 2019

Last week, the ACIR team attended the Fifth CRI-CIMT-EATI-AACR International Cancer Immunotherapy conference in Paris, France. This week’s extensive special feature covers select talks from the conference, which are organized by the topics below. Targeting the PD-1 axis Vaccination...

M2 to M1; macrophage reprogramming can be done!

September 25, 2019

An immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment is one of the biggest hurdles to successful immunotherapy. In many tumors, the presence of M2-polarized macrophages is to blame for immunosuppression. For Zhang et al., the possibility of reprogramming macrophages from the pro-tumor M...

About ACIR

ACIR's mission is to fast-track Cancer Immunotherapy research by helping researchers stay on top of the new literature in this fast-moving and multifaceted field, fostering their creativity and productivity in bringing us ever closer to curing this deadly disease.

The field of cancer immunotherapy has exploded in recent years, drawing on the creativity and experience of scientists, clinicians, and patient advocates. ACIR does an incredible job of bringing these groups together toward a common goal of eliminating cancer by disseminating important research findings to the community at large.

— James Allison, PhD

Professor and Chair, Department of Immunology; Executive Director, Immunotherapy Platform; Director, Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy; and Vivian L. Smith Distinguished Chair-Immunology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

As a researcher bridging the science and clinical translation of the exciting discoveries of cancer immunotherapy, I applaud the efforts of ACIR to help me, my post-docs and students, and my colleagues keep up to date on all the key innovations driving this field. New knowledge continually refines our current thinking and ACIR keeps that new knowledge fresh and at our fingertips.

— Catherine Wu, MD, PhD

Professor of Medicine, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School; Institute Member, Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT

There is a critical need to provide reliable information to physicians and researchers. Key limitations are the large amount of data that is being published and the multiple clinical trials available. I welcome the efforts by ACIR to make sense out of all this data and provide a reliable source of information for researchers in cancer immunotherapy.

— Antoni Ribas, MD, PhD

Professor of Medicine, Surgery, Molecular and Medical Pharmacology at the University of California (UCLA); Director of the Tumor Immunology Program at the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center (JCCC); Director of the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy (PICI) Center at UCLA

The work of ACIR is so beautifully targeted on something that has the potential of being truly useful even in the earliest stages. What a great idea!

— John Petricciani, MD

President of the International Alliance for Biological Standardization (IABS); Former Director of the Center for Biologics at FDA and former Chief Medical Officer of the Biologicals Unit at WHO

Our understanding of the interaction between the immune system and cancer cells, and also the ways to exploit this interaction clinically, is growing faster than ever before. There is no reliable source of information that can help clinicians and researchers in this field stay up-to-date, and by filling this gap, ACIR facilitates the development of effective cancer immunotherapies for an increasing number of patient groups.

— Ton Schumacher, PhD

Deputy Director of the Netherlands Cancer Institute; Professor of Immunotechnology at Leiden University, The Netherlands; Chief Scientific Officer of Kite Pharma EU; SU2C-CRI Immunotherapy Dream Team member

Cancer Immunotherapy is providing patients with novel and durable treatments and the number of available therapies keeps growing. The mission of ACIR is to accelerate the pace by which the field develops through mapping out the research and clinical landscapes and keeping track of key advances in the field. It has my total support!!

— Robert D. Schreiber, PhD

Alumni Endowed Professor of Pathology and Immunology and Professor of Molecular Microbiology at Washington University School of Medicine, MO; Director of the Washington University Center for Human Immunology and Immunotherapy Programs; Associate Director of the Scientific Advisory Board to the CRI

I fully support the important initiative of ACIR. The field of cancer immunotherapy grows at an exciting pace. Staying on top of foundational discoveries in the field, which is conveniently processed on ACIR, is key for coming up with important new hypotheses about immunotherapeutic cancer treatment strategies.

— Glenn Dranoff, MD, PhD

Global Head of Immuno-Oncology, Novartis Institutes of BioMedical Research

I fully endorse the mission of ACIR to provide a weekly synopsis of the scientific literature in cancer immunotherapy. The value of this approach has been clearly demonstrated by a program I have been involved in with the Prize4Life Foundation, which is dedicated to curing ALS. ALS Forum provides ALS research summaries as well as other content related to clinical trials and is widely used by the ALS research community to keep up to date.

— Tom Maniatis, PhD

Chairman of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics at the Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) in New York, and Director of the University wide Columbia Precision Medicine Initiative (CPMI)

ACIR has identified a great way to meet the critical need of researchers and clinicians everywhere to stay up to date with the literature in the fast moving and life-saving field of cancer immunotherapy. This will be a fine living tribute to your son Matt and has the potential to help many future cancer victims!

— James S. Economou, MD, PhD

Beaumont Professor of Surgery, Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, and Molecular and Medical Pharmacology at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)

I am pleased to voice my support for the mission of ACIR to keep cancer immunotherapy researchers up to date with the current advancements in the field. Given the magnitude of new information emerging from this field, I particularly appreciate their efforts to both identify and highlight the key advancements each week and to distill the new information to key take-away points that can be easily grasped.

— Nir Hacohen, PhD

Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Director, MGH Center for Cancer Immunology; Institute Member, Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT

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