In the Spotlight...

The frequency of neoantigens per somatic mutation rather than overall mutational load or number of predicted neoantigens per se is a prognostic factor in ovarian clear cell carcinoma

Matsushita et al. investigated neoantigen (neoAg) loads in ovarian clear cell carcinoma and found that while neither the number of missense mutations nor the number of predicted neoAgs correlated with improved outcomes, lower neoAg frequency (the number of neoAgs per missense mutation) correlated with a robust immune response and progression-free survival. This suggests that immunoediting of tumor cells with stronger neoantigenic targets had occurred in these patients.

Melanoma sequentially suppresses different DC subsets in the sentinel lymph node, affecting disease spread and recurrence

Flow cytometry analysis of DC subsets in sentinel lymph nodes (LN) of 28 Stage I-III melanoma patients revealed a fascinating progression of reduced DC activation status with increasing disease stage, and differential effects on migratory vs. LN resident DCs. Suppression of skin-derived migratory DC activity was directly associated with increased recurrence near the primary disease site, while suppression of LN-resident populations correlated with the appearance of metastases.

About ACIR

ACIR's mission is to fast-track Cancer Immunotherapy Research by helping YOU to stay on top of the new literature in this fast moving and multifaceted field, fostering YOUR creativity and productivity in bringing us ever closer to curing this deadly disease.

The work of ACIR and the Fritsch Foundation is so beautifully targeted on something that has the potential of being truly useful even in the earliest stages. What a great idea! " — John Petricciani, MD President of the International Alliance for Biological Standardization (IABS); Former Director of the Center for Biologics at FDA and former Chief Medical Officer of the Biologicals Unit at WHO
Our understanding of the interaction between the immune system and cancer cells, and also the ways to exploit this interaction clinically, is growing faster than ever before. At present, there is no reliable single source of information that can help clinicians and researchers in this field stay up-to-date, and by filling this gap, the Fritsch Foundation and ACIR.org initiative will facilitate the development of effective cancer immunotherapies for an increasing number of patient groups." — Ton Schumacher, PhD Deputy Director of the Netherlands Cancer Institute; Professor of Immunotechnology at Leiden University, The Netherlands; Chief Scientific Officer of Kite Pharma EU; SU2C-CRI Immunotherapy Dream Team member
Cancer Immunotherapy is providing patients with novel and durable treatments and the number of available therapies keeps growing. The mission of the Fritsch Foundation and its ACIR.org website—to accelerate the pace by which the field develops through mapping out the research and clinical landscapes and keeping track of key advances in the field—is an initiative that has my total support!! " — Robert D. Schreiber, PhD Alumni Endowed Professor of Pathology and Immunology and Professor of Molecular Microbiology at Washington University School of Medicine, MO; Director of the Washington University Center for Human Immunology and Immunotherapy Programs; Coleader of the Tumor Immunology Program of Washington University's Siteman Comprehensive Cancer Center; Associate Director of the Scientific Advisory Board to the Cancer Research Institute
I fully support the important new initiative of the Fritsch Foundation. The field of cancer immunotherapy grows at an exciting pace. Staying on top of foundational discoveries in the field, which will be conveniently processed on ACIR.org, is key for coming up with important new hypotheses about immunotherapeutic cancer treatment strategies." — Glenn Dranoff, MD, PhD Global Head of Immuno-Oncology, Novartis Institutes of BioMedical Research
I fully endorse the mission of the Fritsch Foundation and ACIR.org to provide a weekly synopsis of the scientific literature that bears on the field of cancer immunotherapy. The value and impact of this approach has been clearly demonstrated by a program I have been involved in as a member of the scientific advisory board of the Prize4Life Foundation, which is dedicated to curing the neurodegenerative disease ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis or Lou Gherig’s disease). ALS Forum, a joint effort between Prize4Life and the Alzheimer’s Research Forum provides ALS research summaries and well as links to ALS review articles as well as other content related to clinical trials. This program is widely used by the ALS research community to keep up to date with the rapidly moving scientific literature on ALS." — Tom Maniatis, PhD Chairman of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics at the Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) in New York, and Director of the University wide Columbia Precision Medicine Initiative (CPMI)
The Fritsch Foundation and ACIR.org have identified a great way to meet the critical need of researchers and clinicians everywhere to stay up to date with the literature in the fast moving and life-saving field of cancer immunotherapy. This will be a fine living tribute to your son that has the potential to help many future cancer victims!" — James S. Economou, MD, PhD Beaumont Professor of Surgery, Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, and Molecular and Medical Pharmacology at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)
At a time when immunotherapy is being used for the treatment of increasing numbers of patients with cancer, there is a critical need to provide reliable information to patients, physicians and researchers. Key limitations to get to the reliable sources of information are the large amount of data that is being generated and published, the multiple clinical trials available and the differences in the ability of patients to access these therapies. Given these limitations, I welcome the efforts by The Fritsch Foundation and ACIR.org to make sense out of all this data and provide a reliable and timely source of information for the whole community of patients and researchers. They have full time scientists reviewing the data and pointing to the most important advances in the field of cancer immunotherapy." — Antoni Ribas, MD, PhD Professor of Medicine, Surgery, Molecular and Medical Pharmacology at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA); Director of the Tumor Immunology Program at the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center (JCCC); Director of the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy (PICI) Center at UCLA; Chair of the Melanoma Committee at SWOG